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Author Topic: Rookie mistake  (Read 1267 times)

March 06, 2013, 04:24:32 PM
Reply #15

dburr

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Re: Rookie mistake
« Reply #15 on: March 06, 2013, 04:24:32 PM »
Heat will do fine, when I pull the wires from stich and glue built skiffs, a propane torch does the trick, go easy and let the heat travel in the bolt then go with Scotty's suggestion and twist out with a socket.  If you heat and twist at the same time the bond will let go before you damage things.  You will have to twist all the way out unless you get lucky.  No big deal, you've custom formed threads. :cheers:

When all is done if you have ANY worries, over drill and fill with a cabosil, glass strand and epoxy mix.

A fun time is ahead!! :mrgreen:  :mrgreen:
Dave

88 222 Osprey
00 Yamaha OX66 150
CAS # 2590

March 06, 2013, 04:30:13 PM
Reply #16

Callyb

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Re: Rookie mistake
« Reply #16 on: March 06, 2013, 04:30:13 PM »
dburr, Does it work with poly too? I am curious now...been thinking about it all day. :oops:  :roll:

Stitch and glue with wire is the same reason I know about it. I believe I read it in Sam Devlin's book originally.
Carl
___________________________

1966 22-2 Flatback w/diver door (perpetual rebuild) w/Mercury 150

1997 Osprey 245 w/Twin 150 Evinrudes

March 06, 2013, 04:40:07 PM
Reply #17

Necessary Evil

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Re: Rookie mistake
« Reply #17 on: March 06, 2013, 04:40:07 PM »
Sounds like the heat should work. Me, I graduated from the Get A Bigger Hammer School of Mechanical Engineering. I'd have had the bolts or the transom on the garage floor :)
1976 22-2
Roll Tide!

March 06, 2013, 06:29:44 PM
Reply #18

dburr

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Re: Rookie mistake
« Reply #18 on: March 06, 2013, 06:29:44 PM »
Quote from: "Callyb"
dburr, Does it work with poly too? I am curious now...been thinking about it all day. :oops:  :roll:

Stitch and glue with wire is the same reason I know about it. I believe I read it in Sam Devlin's book originally.

Carl it works just fine... There are two parts really, 1. getting the heat right without burning the material that your bonding (plywood etc.) or taking so long to heat that nothing really productive happens. Nothing but trial and error there.. 2. The twisting of the item being removed.  For particularly stubborn fasteners a nice whack can help too.  The shock of the hit is gold.

As far as using a BFH by itself? I've tried that (proud owner of a real 16 lb sledge) with many different materials and after braking some really nice tools :shock:  :oops: , have determined that in the correct circumstance, for stubborn, sticky "I'm gonna let go over the carcus of your favorite wench" fasteners, you cannot beat a good old "gas wrench".  Acetylene is my fave, Mapp at #2, (after a course of PB and other secrets in a well ventilated area yada,yada..) Then go at it with the old Craftsman..:mrgreen:  :mrgreen:

Snap On ain't in this boys budget... :oops:

Devlin's got some nice designs for sure.  Also check out Dynamite (Harold) Payson's Quick and Dirty Boat Designs.  He is just about the king for simplicity with poly, plywood and glass.. And he's a really nice old Maine dude :thumright:

Keep the fire extinguisher handy :mrgreen:  :salut:
Dave

88 222 Osprey
00 Yamaha OX66 150
CAS # 2590

March 08, 2013, 05:59:44 PM
Reply #19

florida196

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Re: Rookie mistake
« Reply #19 on: March 08, 2013, 05:59:44 PM »
Want to think everyone for there assistant and input the heat to the all thread worked great took all of about 20 minutes to get all the bolts out.  Now no excuses to start grinding and moving forward.  Thanks again

 

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