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Author Topic: 1985 196 Rebuild  (Read 1021 times)

October 02, 2020, 06:28:57 PM
Reply #15

cryder

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Re: 1985 196 Rebuild
« Reply #15 on: October 02, 2020, 06:28:57 PM »
Next up is the gunwale guard replacement.  The old stuff looked OK but I wanted to do this to improve the look of the boat and I fond it on sale at Hamilton Marine.  I removed the old stuff and noted that some of the screws holding the deck to the hull were loose or had "ovaled out" the holes all together.  First I used #12 broad head screws and added these to holes where the old gunwale was fastened through the hull and deck.  The new gunwale is taller so it would only "catch" the hull.  I then removed the old deck to hull screws and replaced those with the same #12 broads. These were about 10 per 100 from Jamestown.  I then watched a video on installing a new gunwale that said to heat the product first.  I've done this job a few times without this step but thought it sounded like a good idea.  BTW, the gunwale was, is,  Barbour Plastics Part Number: DWP-92162-FB.  Here's the lesson.  Warm is good but be careful not to stretch it too much as I did.  Laid it in the sun on a nice hot day. Fastened it at the bow with the same #12 broad heads and then stretched it at the stern and had someone fasten it there.  The issue is something called poisson's ratio which being an engineer I should have been more aware of. As you stretch something one way it get's narrower in the perpendicular direction.  Think stretching out taffee. I had a hell of a time getting the white insert into the narrowed gap for same.  I ended using a pair of lock grip used in welding that look like a hammer head and a heat gun and some soap.  Heat 12". squish 3" flat and push it in.  On the plus side it was so hot than when it, the gunwale not the insert, cooled it pulled in VERY tight to the hull and it looks great.  This job was well worth the $200 or so of material.  BTW, I used the recommended way to add pics last time and it was cumbersome to say the least.
Chris

October 02, 2020, 11:12:38 PM
Reply #16

Capt. Bob

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Re: 1985 196 Rebuild
« Reply #16 on: October 02, 2020, 11:12:38 PM »
 :great02: :great02:
]
Capt. Bob
1991 210 Walkaround
2018 Yamaha 150 4 Stroke
"Reef or Madness IV"

May 04, 2021, 08:55:28 PM
Reply #17

cryder

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Re: 1985 196 Rebuild
« Reply #17 on: May 04, 2021, 08:55:28 PM »
OK, I'm gonna add this hear and perhaps it should go someplace else too but I had a 2001 Honda 130 on this boat with a 4 blade 13.25x15 prop that maxed out at about about 5400 RPM.  I used this about 4 times before the rot in the exhaust port killed that engine. I am guessing it went 35 or so with this. But now I just bought a 2021 Suzuki DF140A and with a 4 blade 13*19 it turns 5400+ (still over propped I know) but is much slower as the Suzuki has a 2.59:1 gear box where as the Honda (and old Mercs and a Yamaha F150) have a 2:1 gear box.  The BIG (and I mean HUGE difference here is that the Honda or Merc or Yamaha at 4000 RPM's turn the prop at 2000 RPM.  The Suzuki needs to turn 5180 RPMS at the power head to get 2000 rpms at the prop.  So planing speed with a Yamaha may be  4000 RPM but with the Suzuki it will be nearly 5200.  I have an excel spread sheet that goes over this math.  The Suzuki is lighter BUT if you have a light boat like an aquasport you don't need to worry about working the engine too hard to get up onto a plane.  In theory the suzuki turns a bigger prop but slower and I must be honest, IMHO, the old Honda had a better hole shot and planed the boat at a lower RPM.
Chris

May 04, 2021, 08:57:50 PM
Reply #18

cryder

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Re: 1985 196 Rebuild
« Reply #18 on: May 04, 2021, 08:57:50 PM »
BTW the paint is working very well a year later BUT the white deck was a mistake.  It just shows every spec of dirt and I plan on buying a gallon of black to make up some grey and painting the decks grey now  that I have the engine sorted out.
Chris

May 03, 2022, 07:05:20 PM
Reply #19

aquaman998

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Re: 1985 196 Rebuild
« Reply #19 on: May 03, 2022, 07:05:20 PM »
Hi, I am replacing my tank as well. I see the description of how you pilled new fuels lines. Do you have any pictures besides these? I am trying to figure out where to drill holes to get the new filler and lines up to the fill hole and vent hole. Any info would be excellent. I was thinking I can run the vent line through the existing filler tube and use it as a conduit and run the filler tube where the vent line used to be as it seems to have some play.

May 04, 2022, 10:26:04 AM
Reply #20

dbiscayne

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Re: 1985 196 Rebuild
« Reply #20 on: May 04, 2022, 10:26:04 AM »
Have you tried a different prop on the Suzuki to make up for the gear reduction? I've seen a lot of Suzuki's use a larger diameter prop, not just pitch change, to best push the boat.

May 04, 2022, 10:49:24 AM
Reply #21

cryder

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Re: 1985 196 Rebuild
« Reply #21 on: May 04, 2022, 10:49:24 AM »
Hi, I am replacing my tank as well. I see the description of how you pilled new fuels lines. Do you have any pictures besides these? I am trying to figure out where to drill holes to get the new filler and lines up to the fill hole and vent hole. Any info would be excellent. I was thinking I can run the vent line through the existing filler tube and use it as a conduit and run the filler tube where the vent line used to be as it seems to have some play.
  Hi, I finally gave up on trying to dig through the foam to get the new fuel fill line in.  I used a hole saw to make a new hole to the port of the existing one and I ran it forward below the deck past the end of the fore-aft structure and then up to the fuel fill deck plate.  It does 'flop around' a bit so I spared some foam around it in a few places to hold it. Messy job under the deck. Not optimal but done and after 2 years all OK. I did run the vent line through the abandoned old fuel fill line as you mention.  Lesson learned on that one is don't forget the high loop on the vent line like this dummy did.  I got water in the tank and had to splice in a few feet of hose to make a high loop.  Fortunatly I added a fuel water separator so no harm.  And I added a clam shell over the new vent on the outside to divert water just for good measure.  Another mistake (common as it turns out apparently) is I ran all new wires but what I should have done is run a conduit through the fuel tank coffin area and then run the wires through that. duhh. Not an issue yet but at some point in time I will wish I had a pull string through there.  Hope this helps and good luck.  The more I use my 196 the more I love it.  Perfect sized boat.
Chris

May 04, 2022, 11:21:03 AM
Reply #22

cryder

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Re: 1985 196 Rebuild
« Reply #22 on: May 04, 2022, 11:21:03 AM »
Have you tried a different prop on the Suzuki to make up for the gear reduction? I've seen a lot of Suzuki's use a larger diameter prop, not just pitch change, to best push the boat.
  I really should go back and change all my gripes about the prop and lack of speed.  Here's the story. I now trailer the boat and I noticed a few months ago the bow eye coming loose with the use.  The one thing i did not do but OK NBD. I pulled out the floor to the rope locker to find about 200 lbs of store bought lead ingot in there, glassed carefully in place, which I removed with great effort and replaced the wood block behind the bow eye. When I bought the boat it had been flat backed but the seller took the mount off for the sale. He said the boat never seemed to 'ride right' with a 175 2 stroke on it and having had that problem in a previous boat I decided that when I rebuilt the transom I would NOT flat back it, but I did raise the mount height by 5".  The lead was all store bought so I assume that the original rich Marblehead guy who owned it and paid someone to flat back it for him found out the boat was now out of balance with an engine on a bracket and paid someone to add the lead to get the bow down.  Point being is that now that I 'got the lead out' the boat rides great.  I ended up with a Suzuki 3x14x18 SS prop which is a tad under propped but I have tons of power at all RPM's and the boat planes very comfortably at about 4200 RPM with a full load of gas and 2 adults.  Since I really don't like how the boat handles when going fast, and it is after all a 35+ year old hull I'm careful with the old girl, this is just fine with me.
Chris

June 14, 2022, 03:16:05 PM
Reply #23

Dribs

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Re: 1985 196 Rebuild
« Reply #23 on: June 14, 2022, 03:16:05 PM »
Cryder I am about to install a pie plate for bilge access similar to the hole you have drilled on yours.  Do you have the dimensions from the transom to the edge of the hole you drilled?

June 14, 2022, 03:25:52 PM
Reply #24

Dribs

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Re: 1985 196 Rebuild
« Reply #24 on: June 14, 2022, 03:25:52 PM »
Also what size deck plate did you install?

June 14, 2022, 03:49:41 PM
Reply #25

cryder

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Re: 1985 196 Rebuild
« Reply #25 on: June 14, 2022, 03:49:41 PM »
Hi,  I did not add that access plate as it was there when I bought the boat so I just replaced the 8" nominal size access port and I don't keep the boat at my house so I can not measure it but I do KNOW that in my 1985 196 model there is nothing to 'hit' or 'miss' under the floor aft of the tank coffin.  Come to think of it mine have a (I think) factory mounting platform (flat spot) for the bilge pump.  Looks to be about 12" clear from this picture.  One trick I did which worked well.  I put a screw into the center of the access hatch and used it to hold a zip tie holding the wire connections for the bilge pump up out of the water
Chris

 

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